English idioms

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  • #50205
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    English idioms

    #50206
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    to talk one into doing (out of doing) something — to
    persuade (to dissuade) somebody to do something
    1. “Edna talked him into going,” said Tony. (M. Wilson)
    2. He acted immediately and calmly. Bunder would never, of course, let himself be talked into stopping so that they could give themselves up. Yet stop they must. He moved forward slightly and grasped the hand-brake. (J. Wain)
    3. “My mind’s made up,” said Mrs. Watkins aggressively, … “and I won’t be talked out of it.” (J. Lindsay)

    #50207
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    to get somebody (something) out of one’s mind (head) — to stop thinking about somebody (something), to dis¬ miss somebody (something) from one’s mind
    1. Charles knew that he would never get that smile out of his mind again. (J. Wain)
    2. I wish you’d get Dr. Hasselbacher out of your head. (Gr. Greene)
    3. Jane Gallagher. Jesus. I couldn’t get her off my mind. (J. Salinger)

    #50208
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    to be getting on (to, for, in) — to draw near
    1. “Hello, Max,” he said pleasantly. “You’re getting on in years.” “Oh, I’m just getting ready for my finals, then I’ll bloom again.” (M. Wilson)
    2. Dr. Galbraith was getting on in years. (A. Cronin)
    3. It was getting on to the time for their usual fortnight at the seaside. (W. S. Maugham)
    4. It’s getting on for one o’clock. It’s not fair to your work. (G. Gordon)

    #50209
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    to take (catch) somebody unawares — to surprise to be caught unawares — to be taken by surprise
    1. When I am caught unawares I usually tell the truth. (I. Mur¬doch)
    1. The use of his first name took Wormold unawares. (Gr.
    Greene)

    #50210
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    to keep (a person) in the dark — to hide things from a person; to keep things secret
    to be in the dark about — not to know about or not to understand fully, not to be in the know
    to keep (a thing) dark — to keep it a secret

    1. He must keep Bunder absolutely and permanently in the dark about Dogson and his mission to reveal the secrets of the drug traffic. (J. Wain)
    2. Besides, she was in the dark about his feeling now. (J. Gals¬ worthy)
    3. I don’t see how anyone else but Parker could have sent it. Depend upon it, his own man. But keep it dark — we don’t want to alarm him just yet. (A. Christie)

    #50211
    Main Aditor
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    to feel for someone — to sympathize with
    1. Oh, thank you much, Mr. Grump, I know you would feel for us in our trouble. (R. Aldington)
    2. He remained absurd, but the sincerity of his passion excited one’s sympathy. I could understand how his wife must feel for him. (W. S. Maugham)
    3. Well, he has told me all his story. I feel for him so much. (H. James)

    #50212
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    so far (as yet) — up to now, all the while up to now
    1. Hm! May I ask what you have said so far? (B. Shaw)
    2. Thirty years ago five doctors gave me six months to live, and I’ve seen three of them out so far. (D. Cusack)
    3. So far you are right. (W. S. Maugham)

    #50213
    Main Aditor
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    all along — from the very first, from the very begin¬ning (it implies ‘over a period of time’ or ‘during that period’)
    1. Miss Boland is the daughter of a close friend. Thus, all along, he regarded her as his own responsibility. (A. Cronin)
    2. Savina realized now that all along she had felt a secret superiority to Edna. (M. Wilson)
    3. That’s what I suppose I intended doing all along. (M, Wilson)

    #50214
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    to slip (out of) one’s mind (memory) — to forget
    1. Perhaps you really have a friend called Merde and it slipped your mind. (J. Wain)
    2. … that the main purpose of my visit had slipped from his failing memory. (A. Cronin)

    #50215
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    as good as — practically, almost, nearly
    1. You’ll be as good as new in six months or dead in twelve. (D. Cusack)
    2. You see, I’m an only child. And so are you — of your mother. Isn’t it a bore? There’s so much Expected of one. By the time they’ve done expecting, one’s as good as dead. (J. Galsworthy)

    #50216
    Main Aditor
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    to let oneself in for — to be persuaded to do something
    1. I let myself in for several hours’ boredom every day, Dixon. A couple more won’t break my back. (K. Amis)
    2. Oh, God, Christine, you don’t want to come to that, you’ll be bored stiff. How have you let yourself in for it. (A. Christie)

    #50217
    Main Aditor
    Хранитель

    what’s up? — what is going on? what’s the matter?
    1. “What’s up?” said Adrian to a policeman. (J. Galsworthy)
    2. “What’s up, lad?” — “You made me think of my mother.” (J. Braine)
    21

    3. You’d better wait here, and I’ll go in first and pretend I haven’t seen you, otherwise she’ll guess there’s something up. (D. Cusack)

    #50218
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    in high (great, good) spirits — cheerful
    1. The young woman wore a bunch of violets and seemed in high spirits. (Th. Dreiser)
    2. Carrie reached home in high good spirits, which she could scarcely conceal. (Th. Dreiser)
    3. He was pleased to see the architect in such high spirits and left him to spend the afternoon with Irene, while he stole off to his pictures, after his Sunday habit. (J. Galsworthy)

    #50219
    Main Aditor
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    to let the cat out of the bag — to disclose a secret
    1. From the warmth of her embrace he probably divined that he had let the cat out of the bag, for he rode off at once on irony. (J. Galsworthy)
    2. I shouldn’t have let the cat out. But there it is — it’s a lucky start for you, my dear fellow. (A. Cronin)

    #50220
    Main Aditor
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    to sit up late (to keep late hours) — not to go to bed
    at the usual hours
    1. Alf and Morris swore they could not sleep. They wanted to sit up all night in order to get down to the wagon on time. (K. Prichard)
    2. Bless you! Don’t sit up too late. Anne’s rather in the dumps. (J. Galsworthy)

    #50221
    Main Aditor
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    but for (except for) — if it had not been for (if it was
    not for)
    1. But for that your uncle would have been dead long ago. (J. Galsworthy)
    2. It was curious to reflect that, but for his meeting with these down-and-outs, he would never have been able to continue in his new life. (J. Wain)
    3. But for the war it might never have developed in Ferse, but you can’t tell. (J. Galsworthy)

    #50222
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    it is no use crying over spilt milk (to cry over spilt milk) — to spend time uselessly regretting unfortunate events
    1. “Well, I judge there’s no use crying over spilt milk. Com¬mand me in any way. 1 am your very faithful servant.” And turning round, he went out. (J. Galsworthy)

    2. “Oh, dear me!” exclaimed Carrie. Then she settled back with a sigh. “There is no use crying over spilt milk,” she said. “It’s too late!” (Th. Dreiser)
    3. And the grass — those great places had no grass, he believed! The blossom, too, was late this year — no blossom before they left! Well, the milk was spilled! (J. Galsworthy)

    #50224
    Main Aditor
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    to make a fuss about (over) — to complain or be angry about unimportant things
    1. “Don’t make such a fuss, Mother,” he whispered, on the plat-form, after she had kissed him. “I’ve only been away a short time.” (G. Gordon)
    2. “Fella, darling,” he said, “just don’t make a fuss. If there’s one thing I cannot stand it’s women making a fuss.” (I. Murdoch)
    3. But nobody’s going to make a _fuss about lifting a pair of boots from one of the toffs. (K. Prichard)

    #50225
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    at heart — in one’s heart; in one’s heart of hearts; in one’s secret heart; in one’s inmost self
    1. “The trouble with you, Bill,” said Nan, “is that for all your noisy Labour Party views you’re a snob at heart.” (I. Murdoch)
    2. He went home, uneasy and sore at heart, for this concerned two people of whom he was very fond, and he could see no issue that was not full of suffering to both. (J. Galsworthy)
    3. Short of the most convincing proofs he must still refuse to believe for he did not wish to punish himself. And all the time at heart — he did believe. (J. Galsworthy)

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