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Тег Архивы Dialectology

Lecture about Australian English dialect

Australian English is predominantly British English, and especially from the London area.  R’s are dropped after vowels, but are often inserted between two words ending and beginning with vowels. The vowels reflect a strong “Cockney” influence:  The long a (/ei/) tends towards a long i (/ai/), so pay sounds like pie to an American ear. The long i (/ai/), in turn, tends towards oi, so cry sounds like croy.  Ow …

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Ireland

English was imposed upon the Irish, but they have made it their own and have contributed some of our finest literature.  Irish English is strongly influenced by Irish Gaelic: r after vowels is retained “pure” vowels (/e:/ rather than /ei/, /o:/ rather than /ou/) /th/ and /dh/ > /t/ and /d/ respectively. The sentence structure of Irish English often borrows from the Gaelic: Use of beor do in place of usually: I do.. (I usually …

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Scotland

Scotland actually has more variation in dialects than England!  The variations do have a few things in common, though, besides a large particularly Scottish vocabulary: rolled r’s. “pure” vowels (/e:/ rather than /ei/, /o:/ rather than /ou/) /u:/ is often fronted to /ö/ or /ü/, e.g. boot, good, muin (moon), poor… There are several “layers” of Scottish English.  Most people today speak standard English with little more than the changes …

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West Country dialects

The West Country dialects accents are the English dialects and accents used by much of the indigenous population of South West England, the area popularly known as the West Country. This region encompasses Bristol, Cornwall, Devon, Dorset and Somerset, while Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Wiltshire are usually also included, although the northern and eastern boundaries of the area are hard to define and sometimes even wider areas are encompassed. The West …

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Estuary English

From London down the Thames and into Essex, Sussex, and even Kent, a new working and middle class dialect has evolved and is rapidly become “the” southern dialect.  It combines some of the characteristics of Cockney with RP, but makes much less use of Cockney slang.   East Anglian This dialect is similar to the Southern, but keeps its h’s: t between vowels usually becomes a glottal stop. /ai/ becomes …

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About British English

British English in Southern England In general, Southern English accents are distinguished from Northern English accents primarily by not using the short a in words such as “bath”. In the south-east, the broad A is normally used before a /f/, /s/ or /θ/: words such as “cast” and “bath” are pronounced /kɑːst/, /bɑːθ/ rather than /kæst/, /bæθ/. This sometimes occurs before /nd/: it is used in “command” and “demand” but …

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DIALECTS OF ENGLISH

English is actually an unusual language.  Already a blend of early Frisian and Saxon, it absorbed Danish and Norman French, and later added many Latin and Greek technical terms.  In the US, Canada, Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and elsewhere, it absorbed terms for indigenous plants, animals, foodstuffs, clothing, housing, and other items from native and immigrant languages.  Plus, the various dialects, from Cockney to Jamaican, and innumerable sources …

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About English language

ENGLISH LANGUAGE The English language has its origins in about the fifth century a.d., when tribes from the continent, the Jutes, the Saxons, and then the larger tribe of Angles invaded the small island we now call England (from Angle-land). Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxons, is preserved in Beowulf (c. a.d. 800). Middle English developed following the Norman invasion of 1066, exemplified in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (c. 1400). Modern English, …

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